For every pet owner who swears they had no trouble training their dog, there will be 4 or 5 others who disagree with them. Training a dog is certainly the responsibility of the pet owner or handler, therefore some pets will be more well-mannered than others, regardless what breed they are. Still, we have found that certain dog breeds have a reputation for being difficult to handle, being stubborn, or inclined towards disobedience if they are not instructed with a consistent firm hand. Here are a few of the breeds that have proven difficult to train.

Breeds That are Difficult to Train

Airedale Terrier

Airedale Terrier

Airedale Terriers:  Though these dogs have been regarded as the “terrier of all terriers” it could be because they embody tenacity and rambunctiousness. They are large, and require endless mental and physical stimuli, which can make both exercise and dog training an exhausting and trying job.

Afghan Hound

Afghan Hound

Afghan Hounds: Though some pet owners find the most intelligent dogs to be the most challenging to control, the less intelligent dogs prove to be the same. While ranking which dog breeds show the fastest respond times to commands, it was the Afghan Hound to come in last place.  Let this be a warning to prospective pet parents who are considering adding one of these shaggy pups to their family.

Bullmastiff

Bull Mastiff

Bull Mastiffs:  These dogs are enormous in stature, and can be difficult to manage.  They do not typically get along well with other dogs, nor are the very controlled when it comes to predatory instincts.  Pet owners have to work very hard to teach these animals to resist their instincts and yield to authority.  (Be warned, they are not the most hygienic of beasts either!)

Chow Chow Dog

Chow Chow

Chow Chow:  The Chow Chow resembles a teddy bear while young, but they can be ferociously independent when they grow up. They are intelligent dogs that have jealous tendencies, can refuse to cooperate when they don’t want to do something.  The best way to raise a Chow is to have multiple training sessions weekly while they are young and intermittently throughout adulthood.

Rottweiler

Rottweiler

Rottweiler: These guard dogs are known for being resistant to authority unless they have a healthy respect for their owner. Rottweilers are strong animals, and will often growl to communicate their dislike of something, and can become headstrong if they are not trained from an early age.

Weimaraner

Weimaraner

Weimaraner: Though lithe and beautiful, some pet owners find training the Weimaraner to be a laborious task. They are inclined towards severe separation anxiety, and destructive behaviors if left alone too long. They struggle to cohabitate with smaller animals such as cats and pet rodents, and have trouble learning to respect commands such as “no” “off” or “drop.” While having a well-trained Weimaraner is not impossible, it does require plenty of work to achieve.

Blue Heeler (Australian Cattle Dog)

Blue Heeler (Australian Cattle Dog)

Blue Heeler: (Australian Cattle Dog) The breed is an intense combination of Bull terrier, Dingo, Collie and Dalmatian, to name a few of his ancestors. Because of this, these dogs are quick-witted, determined animals that are extremely high energy. They can be stubborn and defensive, making training them a serious chore.

Dalmatian

Dalmatian

Dalmatians: Don’t let Disney fool you, not every Dalmatian is as gentle and docile as Pongo and Purdita. If left alone in the house, these pups can turn the room upside-down with their foraging, exploring, and general raucous. They are tough to train in that they need plenty of attention, exercise, and rigid rules to be upheld if you want to get these dog’s best behavior.

Other breeds that are tricky to train: Siberian Huskies, Bulldogs,  Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Pomeranians, etc.

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