When it comes to identifying new dog breeds, the American Kennel Club is the authority in this country. The registry maintains a list of purebred dog pedigree in the United States, promotes dog breeds, identifies official breed clubs, and holds dog shows, events, and competitions. Though it remains separate from the Federation Cynologique Internationale (the World Canine Organization), the AKC is still the single largest purebred dog registry in the nation. For this reason, having a developing dog breed officially recognized by the American Kennel Club, is a monumental step as there are less than 190 breeds (of the 400 dog breeds that exist) which the AKC recognizes. This year alone, the AKC is approving 4 dogs breed which are listed below

Spanish Water Dog: Not to be confused with the Portuguese Water Dog, the Spanish variety originated in Turkey, and eventually traveled to Spain. This versatile breed is used as a guard dog, sheepdog, and is also an excellent retrieving companion for those who enjoy hunting. Their upbeat demeanor and winning personality makes these wooly-cord coated beauties a superior family companion.

Spanish Waterdog (Photo by Perrodeaguas)

Spanish Waterdog (Photo by Perrodeaguas)

Cirneco dell’Etna: This sleek, ruddy dog has a similar appearance to that of the Pharaoh Hound. This breed, whose name is derived from the Sicilian Mount Etna, is considered both a sight and sound hound. They are fast runners, with high-energy and stamina, who require plenty of exercise but less grooming than other breeds.

Cirneco dell’Etna

Cirneco dell’Etna

Boerboel: Also known as the “South African Mastiff” these mighty dogs were bred as working dogs on the farm, and guard dogs on the home front. The word “boer” means “farmer” in Afrikaans, so Boerboel literally means “Farmer’s Bull.”   These large dogs are smart, gentle, and protective, though they require plenty of obedience training early in life.

Boerboel

Boerboel

Bergamasco Shepherd: This breed has a coat more like a Puli, in that it “cords up” and takes a dread-lock kind of shape. The coats take about one year to cord fully, and about 5 years before they grow all the way to the ground. Contrary to common belief, this kind of coat is actually very easy to care for, and requires little grooming. The Bergamascos are a historic herding breed that is just not receiving recognition by the AKC, because the population of these dogs is finally beginning to grow in the United States.

Bergamasco Shepherd

Bergamasco Shepherd

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