Pekingese

Pekingese dogs are a unique canine breed often confused with the more common Shih Tzu or the Javanese. However this ancient dog breed has been around since the great Chinese city of Beijing was once called Peking. Find out the history, personality and fun facts about these chipper little pups

  • The long coat of a Pekingese requires consistent grooming and daily brushing, as they tend to shed. They also will need their teeth brushed and their eyes wiped from time to time, as they can get goop or dust in them. The coat of a Pekingese can come in a wide variety of colors including: black ,biscuit, black-and-tan, cream, fawn, sable, gray, red, red sable, white, etc. (There are other color variations such as brindle and light red, but these are not considered to be show-worthy shades.)
  • Pekingese dogs can be possessive, but overall they make excellent companion pets for other animals. They tolerate cats, show comradery with other dogs, and are well-suited for children beyond the toddler stage.
  • People who think Pekingese dogs have a bit of a chip on their shoulder may be right! These pups were once so elite in value, that they were available only to be owned by the royals. Any commoner found with a Pekingese dog could be put to death.
  • Pekingese dogs (which were named after the old city of Peking) date back to before the 8th century during the Tang Dynasty. They were originally bred to look like the Chinese guardian lions, or the “foo dogs” as they were called. They were believed to be somewhat sacred, and even would be kept in the form of house idols on display.

    Chinese Guardian Lion

    Chinese Guardian Lion

  • Pekingese dogs were first introduced to the United Kingdom when the British troupes had invaded the Imperial Palace in 1860. Several of the dogs found on site were brought back to England, and were presented to Queen Victoria. The breed was later transported to American, and became officially recognized by the AKC (American Kennel Club) in 1906.
  • These dogs have short snouts, causing them to be among the dog breeds with breathing difficulties. They can wheeze, snort and breathe noisily if they are exercising or overheated. Pekingese dogs also have a reputation for snoring.
  • This breed is an eager eater that at times can become territorial over food and toys. However, they are also loyal, alert, confident and expressive little dogs. Training the Pekingese may be tricky since they can be headstrong and resistant to correction unless the owner is consistent and firm with them.
  • Pekingese pooches tend to live from 10-15 years, and while they do make good apartment pets, they thrive with at least 25-30 minutes of exercise per day. The dogs also enjoy playtime with their owners, and though they are laid-back and gentle, they are generally up for an active time.

Subscribe to our FREE newsletter