Some dog breeds so similarly resemble another that they are nearly indistinguishable to the untrained eye. However closely related the pups might seem, there are things you can learn to recognize to determine which is which. Here is a quick at-a-glance chart summarizing the major differences between these twin-like dogs.

Similar-looking Dog Breeds

1. Vizsla & Weimaraner

These dogs are often confused because of their mirror-like sleek bodies, distinct postures and builds.
Though both are medium sized athletic dogs, the Vizsla is usually shorter than the Weimaraner and their ears tend to hang slightly lower. Vizslas are most often coppery gold, brown, or reddish gold colored and Weimaraners are silvery gray or blue.

Vizsla (left) & Weimaraner (right) – Main Picture Above

2. French Bulldog & Boston Terrier

The reason why these two dogs look alike is that the French Bulldog owes part of its breeding heritage to the Boston Terrier. Though they might look like siblings, there are a few ways to quickly tell which is which. Boston Terriers tend to have pointier ears, longer legs and taller bodies than the stockier short French Bulldogs. The terriers are black and white, or brindle brown and white, while the French Bulldog comes in all varieties of colors.

French Bulldog (left) & Boston Terrier (right)

French Bulldog (left) & Boston Terrier (right)

3. Pit Bull & Staffordshire Terrier:
Reputation alone ought to make these dog breeds stand apart, as the Staffordshire Terrier is regarded as a gentle family dog, while the Pit Bull as a breed has the highest record of human attacks. Tell these two pups apart by the thicker, boxier build of the Staffie, and the longer muzzle. Pits are heavier, larger and are more likely to have docked ears.

Staffordshire Terrier (left) & Pitbull Terrier (right)

Staffordshire Terrier (left) & Pitbull Terrier (right)

4. Husky & Malamute
Any Husky breed is tough to set apart at first until you know what features to look out for. Malamutes only ever have brown eyes, while Huskies can have blue or multi-colored eyes. Husky dogs tend to be more lithe with thinner coats, while Malamutes are larger pups with heavier coats.

Husky (left) & Malamute (right)

Husky (left) & Malamute (right)

5. Italian GreyHound & Whippet
The Italian Greyhound and the Whippet both are fragile-looking dogs with pointy ears, long narrow snouts and legs meant for speed and grace. However, next to each other it is easy for the differences to be noted, as Whippets are bigger and more muscular than Italian Greyhounds, who have more delicate limbs and notably highly arched backs.

Whippet (top) & Italian Grayhound (bottom)

Whippet (top) & Italian Greyhound (bottom)

6. Puli & Komondor
It is not a common sight to see a corded-coat dog waltzing down the street. In fact few people may be aware that there are numerous breeds with this unique kind of coat. The tricky part is that Pulis (which are typically black, wheat or brown) also come in white, meaning he could easily be confused for his fair-furred cousin. However the Komondor is much larger and taller than a Puli, who weighs 25-35 pound, which is a far cry from the 80-100 pounds of the substantial Komondor.

Puli (top) & Komondor (bottom)

Puli (top) & Komondor (bottom)

7. Bichon Frise & Maltese
These fluffy white balls of fur look almost exactly the same at first blush, however these dogs are very different. The Maltese is considered a toy dog (weighing less than 7 pounds), while the Bichon Frise is classified in the non-sporting group (and can weigh up to 18 pounds). The Bichon Frise is a great option for people who need a hypoallergenic pet, as their thick double coats do not shed, while the Maltese can grow long silky white hair with its single layer coat.

Maltese (top) & Bichon Frise (bottom)

Maltese (top) & Bichon Frise (bottom)

8. Tamaskan &  Wolf – The Tamaskan is a recent breed only acknowledged by the AKC in 2013. They so closely resemble actual wolves because they are not far removed, and there are less than 700 of these pups that exist. The rare Tamaskan dogs are fully domesticated, and are obedient family pets when they have a strong leader and sufficient exercise.

Tamaskan (top) & Wolf (bottom)

Tamaskan (top) & Wolf (bottom)

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